The works of Award winning author, Rick Pipito, and more

Posts tagged “Dan Pipito

In the works 2014

I’ve received quite a few emails from those who’ve read my novels, asking, “Rick, when are you going to release your next novel in your horror series?”  With all kind words and compliments, I’d like to thank those fan emails.  I enjoy responding to each of them.  So, I decided that to answer the questions asked, I’ll post on what is in the works.

First, my novels:  Now that copyrights are in place and my agent gave me the okay, I’m finally able to give a hint as to what the next book is about.  “Genetic Morsels” begins a new trilogy of novels that take place in the not so distant future.  The next step in human evolution has begun, and with it is presented a whole new era of conflict.  As people with extraordinary abilities struggle to control their genetic code, those who are “normal” worry about extinction.  This is not just a novel where people run around in tights like superheroes…. no… in fact, it is the contrary, and based in this physical world, where it is a much more realistic and horrifying take on what it would be like to develop powers.  Think about if you could generate fire from your hands, but each time you do it, your hands burn as if placed in a heat source.  The powers could be a gift, but they could also kill the user or severly hurt them.  Look for this book in 2015.

Also in the works is the “Pandora’s Chaos” trilogy.  This will compile my novels: “Souls 4 Supper,” “Devil’s Dessert,” and “Techno Feast,” and will have the added bonus of the spinoff graphic novel stories, and some hints as to whats to come for the next trilogy.  This is a stand alone trio in the series that will be released in 4th Quarter 2014.

Finally, my first book, “Flesh And Leftovers,” is being adapted by sCrypt Sound into an audiobook.  I’ve been working around the clock with adapting the audio and working with some amazing voice actors/actresses.  It’s been a lot of fun, but consuming much time.

Next up, sCrypt Comics: Dan and I would like to officially announce sCrypt Sound.  This is a component of our sCrypt brand that opens new doors for us.  I record music often, and now that we’ve got a halfway decent studio in place, sCrypt Sound will focus on recording not just my music, but our audio book conversions, as well as any potential future podcasts.

The next graphic novel, “Devil’s Dessert: Demonic Entities” will be released in 2015.  We had to take a break from the overwhelming work load of the graphic novels, and are perfecting the stories to be converted into graphic form.  We will be announcing artists as soon as this kicks into high gear.

Instead of the graphic novel, however, we are working on a children’s book. “A Little Girl In the Land of The Hiccups” is a short story written by myself (Rick Pipito) and will be illustrated by Dan Pipito.  To be released this holiday season.

Other Miscellaneous works:  While Dan is working hard on his own artistic endeavors, I’m gearing up for a summer season of musical fun.  For the first time in a long time, I’ll return to the stage as a solo act, playing guitar, singing and harmonica.  With a mixture of originals and cover songs, the plan is appeasing all audiences of every type of music.

My podcast, “Think About This” is on indefinite hiatus at this time.  My cohost (and wife), Roberta, is hard at work with her Homemade Delish brand, and the podcast has had to take a back seat in order to accomplish some goals.  We do plan on returning when we can though.  In the meantime, I’ve been assisting with her success, and we are both confident that this will enable me to take sCrypt and my works as well as hers to a whole new level and beyond.

Also, don’t forget that our new sCrypt store is up.  While you can’t get my books (available at http://www.lulu.com and http://www.amazon.com) or the comics (available at http://www.indyplanet.com) there, you CAN get other cool merchandise to support us.  Bumper stickers, T-Shirts, collectible glasses and coasters and more are all available at http://www.cafepress.com/scrypt

As always, feel free to ask any questions, and if you are interested in working with us on a project, feel free to contact us here or at scryptcomics@gmail.com  .  While you wait for our new releases, we will continue to put some in depth reviews of upcoming movies, TV series, and animated projects.  Thanks for following, and stay tuned.  🙂

 

 

 


The sCrypt Merchandise store

fleshcupRick and Dan Pipito are proud to announce the opening of our new cafepress store.  While the store does not have our novels or comics for sale (those are available at the links on the right of this page), it does include a whole new batch of awesome goodies.

Available are collectible pint glasses with Dan Pipito’s cover art for the novels written by Rick Pipito.  To accompany that are optional coasters for the tumblers, which have the cover art for our sCrypt comics on them.  There is also an argument book shotglass, window/bumper stickers, and T-Shirts for men and women in different sizes.

coasterComing soon to the store will also be the most exciting of these.  You will soon be able to purchase 16×20 inch canvases for your wall.  The canvasses will be the amazing cover art Dan did for the novel covers with his signature on them, AND a few other designs that we scrapped in the process.

Help support our ongoing and ever expanding crusade of awesome storytelling by buying something for yourself or for a gift.  We hope you like what we have, and are open to suggestions for future items.  Please spread the word, and thank you for the support.

sticksCheck out the store here: http://www.cafepress.com/scrypt


Cover art for “Techno Feast”

techno Feast coverRick Pipito’s newest novel is just around the corner, and what better way to tease the technological thriller, than to show the cover art, done of course by none other than his brother Dan Pipito.  Let us know what you think.  Are you as excited as we are for the March 2014 release?


short story – Ghostly Hauntings

Front cover

These are stories that expand upon the novel “Souls 4 Supper.”

You’re speaking with your grandfather. It seems like forever since you have last seen him, but your conversation reminds you of being a child again. Then it dawns on you. Your grandfather has been dead for years. As you focus your eyes on him, he vanishes. His absence forces a feeling of dread as your hair stands on end.

**UPDATE: This is now available as a short story in text form in print at lulu.com and on amazon in digital as part of the Pandora’s chaos trilogy extras

 Written by Rick Pipito, with featured art by: Dan Pipito, Joe Parisi, Kristie Vanderzee, Michael A Garard Jr, Jacob Greenawalt, Kelly Swann, Muhammad Nurul, Mao Estheim, and Asher Humm.

Artist Story Details:

Joe Parisi returns as a sCrypt veteran artist, and this time, he is illustrating a story about a haunted book where the pages tell the tale of its reader.

Dan Pipito goes back to his own childhood in this issue, and helps to tell the tale of old man Butsy, who murdered his wife.  Her spirit will not be happy.

Kelly Swann brilliantly illustrates the story of Djinn, a spirit trapped within a lamp, whose magical wishes are not all that the wisher desires.

Michael A Garard Jr is a newcomer whose art is featured in two stories.  The first of which tells about the lost souls and their connection to heaven and hell.  The other story takes the main character to a graveyard to investigate why the spirits there are so angry.

Kristie Vanderzee returns by showing us the ghost town of Atlantis after it has risen from the depths of the ocean.

Jacob Greenawalt illustrates a sequel story from issue #1.  Detective Hwong has had a near death experience leaving her with the ability to see the ghosts of the dead.

Asher Humm had a one issue hiatus, but is back to show just how close to the spirit realm we travel while sleeping.

Mao Estheim comes at us from Japan with her Mangaesque style in a haunting that may just be a hoax after all.

Muhammad Nurul resides in Great Britain, but this Indonesian native draws the story of a child whose imaginary friend is more than just in his mind.

Souls 4 Supper: Ghostly Hauntings  is TM and © Rick Pipito. All rights reserved.

ghfamily


Mission: sCrypt Comics

Rick Pipito 2013Hey folks, just wanted to say that I apologize for the lack of posting as of lately.  Things have been hectic and my projects have all piled up.  So with that being said, I’ve been throwing around the idea of making this a more sCrypt comics oriented site.  Does this mean I will not be doing posts involving other works?  NO… I plan to continue doing that, but on a more laid back level.  Here’s my idea for the future of this site:

1)  I will continue (as I mentioned) doing reviews of certain comic books, comic book movies, and my crossover character versus battles.  These will just be fewer in frequency.

2) Artist of the Month selections will never go away.  I feel that I owe it to each artist who completes something toward my works to have an Artist of the Month spot.  I want to get their names and talent out there to show how great they really are.

3) sCrypt Comics graphic novels: We already have 3 published issues and a 4th coming in September 2013.  These titles are available at www.indyplanet.com and I will have some previews posted of the next one soon.  Please visit the “COMICS” section of this site to see which titles are available and what they are about.

4) Novels by Rick Pipito:  The novels and books that are the reason sCrypt Comics exists are becoming more impressive each time, and the fans love them.  They are a series yes, but not all are required for reading, as they each deal with something different.  In other words, if you don’t like zombies, then go to book 2 and read about my vampires or choose another topic.  The plan is to never do the same thing twice in novel form.  These books can be purchased in print at www.lulu.com as well as www.amazon.com for the kindle.

5) A new comic strip has been in the works for two months now, and we are about to release the first one within the next week.  It will be a “sCrypt Comics Presents:” title and will stray quite a bit from our normal horror oriented works.  This will be a family friendly comic strip that will be enjoyable and funny.  Here’s the best part… it’s free for everyone.  I will post them up here on this site for your viewing pleasure and feedback.  Our first series will be entitled: “The Adventures of Munchies and Deedoos.”  More details will be released in the coming days as well, and we are looking for artists who may be interested in presenting their talent toward one of the many written stories for this series.

6) Books in the works:  “TECHNO FEAST” is the next installment in the Flesh and Leftovers series, and it strays far from the format that began it all.  There will still be ten short stories that tie into the overall plot, and if you want a teaser I’ll say this….  No one is safe from cyberspace.  This book will wrap up my second trilogy, and pave way for a third trilogy that will take place decades later…  Basically an all new cast of characters will be introduced for the next trilogy which will give it a fresh feel.  Of course, there are other novels planned out in addition to this, but Techno Feast is my main concentration right now.

7) Comics in the works:  Following next month’s release of “S4S: Ghostly Hauntings” we will take a month break and get right into finding artists for our next graphic novel, which will be a spinoff of book 5 and involve Angels, demons, Heaven and Hell.  If you are an artist interested in being a part of this, please feel free to contact me.  The spots fill quickly, and it is a first come first serve basis.

8) other online freebies:  I placed my M.U.T.S. (Military Underground Tactical Specialists) Files spinoff series on the back burner for a little bit, but I plan to work that into early 2014.  These will be a series of short stories that will be published on this site, and will feature a single sketch by selected artists to accompany my story.  Occasional contests will continue as well for opportunities to win autographed copies of my works and more.

9) Other goals:  I’ve got a lot of great things in the works in addition to these, I’m just sorry that I can’t spill them all now.  In addition to my novels and the sCrypt Comics graphic novels, I am cohost to a fun and humorous podcast called THINK ABOUT THIS.  We can be downloaded for free from itunes as well as from our site: www.thinkaboutthis.podbean.com Please, check us out, as we touch quite a bit on what I’ve got going on as well as my wife’s rising success and fame with www.homemadedelish.com .  I’ve been working alongside her each day and night to accomplish her goals, which will help with mine as well.

Finally, I want to say that if you are interested in an interview with me, my brother Dan Pipito (cofounder of sCrypt Comics) or any of the artists we’ve worked with, please email me.  I’m more than happy to answer questions and have fun conversation for your site or personal inquiries.  And don’t forget to review my books, comics, and podcast episodes.  I try hard to spread the word about other talent out there, and would love to have feedback about my own works.

Thank you for being such great followers.  I can’t wait for the next big thing that I get to share with you all.


Interview with sCrypt Comics about BAB: In Case Of Werewolf

Bones At Breakfast In Case Of Werewolf – Interview with Rick Pipito and Dan Pipito about their third sCrypt Comics issue

The following questions were submitted to sCrypt Comics in celebration of their new release.

Q1: What is the third sCrypt Comics issue all about?

Rick: It is a spinoff of my third novel, “Bones At Breakfast.”  There are ten short stories about werewolves that tie together into one larger plot, and this comic fills in more detail and supplemental material to the existing works.

Q2: One of the things sCrypt Comics does is you guys gather an array of artists.  Who do we have working on this issue with sCrypt, and how did you find them?

Dan: Jacob Greenawalt is an artist whom I worked with in college as an animator.  He has a very clean style, and is enthusiastic about his work and collaborating with other artists.  Jake had done some artwork that actually fit right in with the story he ended up doing.  When he heard what we were doing, he wanted to get back into doing some still work, and we immediately signed him on.

Rick: Joe Parisi is back again for a third time.  He actually began his own weekly web comic recently, but still wanted to work with us.  It’s great because he brings a different style each time to the stories he does.  I actually had him and his fiancé over one night for dinner to discuss the comics.  Meeting the artists is one of the best parts of these projects, and to finally sit down with one of them on a more personal level, is even better yet.

Kelly Swann is the first artist to really find us.  I placed a post on our blog about issue #3, and she had contacted us within a couple of hours of the post.  She is sort of a history buff, and does a lot of military and historic type drawings.  Most of her stuff is based in reality, so when she ended up choosing a Norse mythology inspired story, I was really interested in seeing where it would go.  She’s working on her own books with her artwork, and will be working with us again in our upcoming sCrypt web series of short stories, so stay tuned for that.

Kristie Vanderzee didn’t have even a quarter of the time that everyone else had.  One of our artists dropped out at the last minute, and I posted a panic call out on facebook.  A mutual friend of ours introduced me to Kristie, and she was more than eager to do the work.  With only three weeks, she banged it out, and she’ll be back for issue #4 next year, so that we can see even more of what she can do in a better amount of time.  We’re grateful to have all the artists, especially when they are dedicated to her level.

Dan Pipito of course is back, because he’s half of the insanity that is sCrypt.  He took a different approach and went with a futuristic story this time around.  Plus he did most of the compilation, cover art and interior work.

Sakura Jones is another returning artist.  She worked with us on our last one, and so this being her second go at it, she decided to use a little more color, and a new style.  I think that she was able to capture the feel of the story really well.  The Eden Wave from the novels was recreated in her own eye, but what she had done with it was exactly what I had envisioned from my own perspective, so I’m glad that she was able to interpret it on a similar level.

 

Dan: Michael Coppolecchia is someone whom I met through a mutual friend.  I heard that in his past, he had worked for Marvel Comics as well as doing some video game cover art (Marvel Ultimate Alliance was one of them).  Immediately I was like “Holy Crap,” how the hell do you get that kind of job?  He had gotten out of the business for a little while, and while we were talking, I threw out the idea to him.  Mike was actually interested in getting back into comic book work, and he went with sCrypt, and showed us his portfolio of very professional comic book art.  Since uniting with us, I believe he has been making more contacts to get back into the industry himself.  He’s always busy and has a passion for comics, so we were honored to have him.

Rick: Ken Hensley was another mutual friend contact, and the first artist on board for this issue.  I put a post out there about how we were gearing up, and someone gave me Ken’s contact info.  He had a lot going on personally, and hesitated a little on committing, but I could tell that he really wanted to do it.  He had a passion for it in his words, so we talked a little, and once I told him the time frame, he came on board.  I wrote his story based on an actual event, and he was the one who said to me, “Hey, do you mind if I put inspired by true events at the bottom of the title page?”  I thought that was a great idea, and am extremely happy with his work.

Dan: It’s very cool to see the artists as they progress through a story, and Ken hit us up every step of the way.  In fact, most of the artists did this time around.  They wanted our approval, and we wanted it to be their interpretations.  All around, I think we had a very pleasant experience.

Rick: Ivy Duffy is one of the artists who showed us character concepts etc.  A friend of mine told me that his wife might be interested in doing comic book work.  It turned out that the horror and fantasy realm was a little out of her style, but that she knew someone who would be more than willing.  Ivy was this person.  She’s young, so this was perfect for her to throw into a college portfolio.

Scott Modrzynski is another unique artist.  He has a passion for comic books as well, but his take on art sets him aside.  His Foo-Gos art (as he dubs it) consists of making pictures with food.  He contacted me through the sCrypt comics blog, and said that he wanted to do it, but might not be able to do a full framed out work.  I told him that we could do it in a storybook format, and he chose Annabelle and The Prince (which is my take on the Beauty and The Beast story).   He sketched out his ideas, and then contacted me to say that the cost of buying the food to do such an elaborate piece of art would be too difficult.  At that point he offered to do it in another medium if I was willing, and I agreed.  I wanted his work to be a part of ours as well.  So, he used his camera to take some silhouetted pictures.  Once he did that, he worked some magic and created a very cool visual for his story.

Q3:  That sounds like a really great team.  What was the most difficult part of the process?  Were there bumps in the road, so to speak?

Dan: For me personally, it was finding the time.  I was looking for a job and trying to make ends meet.  Comic book wise though, communicating with everyone is sometimes an issue.  You might not hear from someone for a month, but have to check to see where they are at without sounding too overbearing.  It really wasn’t a big deal this time, but we did have one drop out at last minute that we didn’t want to lose, but there are no hard feelings.  There was a good reason behind it, but the last minute decision sent us into a frantic search.  Of course, after we found a replacement, the original artist emailed us, saying that they had done some sketches and would have the work completed.  The hardest part was telling them, “No.”  Like I said, there are no hard feelings, but it wouldn’t have been professional of us to bring someone in and let them go just because someone who backed out had changed their mind.  That artist understood the decision though, and everything worked out fine.

Rick: For me it was patience.  I’m used to being in charge of things and having control of situations to an extent.  Working with so many artists for just the pay of a copy of the final work and advertising their name is nerve wracking.  It is at the end when I wait and realize that sometimes some artists procrastinate until the end.  Then I worry about the deadline I set, and it not only affects me, but the other artists whom I promised a finished product to.  I’ll get one artist who might get their work done in the first month of the project (well ahead of time), but then there will be the right down to the wire or few days late addition that has me chewing my fingertips off.

Q4: How did the cover ideas (back and front) as well as interior credits page come about?

Rick: I had a box of bones from a medical skeleton at my disposal and some synthetic hair.  I presented the idea to Dan, and he really did all the work here.

Dan: We wanted to keep with the trilogy theme, so I set it up like a breakfast plate.  I like the dark and grittiness to this comic, and the cover reflects that.  We kept it simple, but to the point.  The back cover remained simple as well as the interior credits.  We just wanted enough to show more bones without taking away from the overlying text.

Q5: Where do you guys go from here?  What are future plans?

Rick: I’m always writing.  There are more novels in the series coming, one of them being a late October 2012 release.  It will center around ghosts, so that is where we are going with issue 4 “Souls 4 Supper: Ghostly Hauntings.”  We are looking at a 2013 release for that.

Dan: We are also planning a web series for our blog.  We haven’t figured out all of the specifics yet, but it will exist in Rick’s “Flesh And Leftovers” and our sCrypt Comics universe.  Designed like a one-shot, it will be a short story based on characters from the novels, and serve as their origins before all the “horror” happened.  “The M.U.T.S. Files” will involve military and real life type scenarios to captivate a new audience.  The idea is that we will get one artist per story to do a few still shots with just us giving them the character descriptions and the story.  They will be able to create the images how they’d like.  Of course this is a great way all around.  For the fans, they get more material.  For the artists, they get exposure.  For Rick, it brings people in to his books, and for sCrypt it will bring in more fans as well.  All around it is a win win idea that we need to find time to work in.

Q6: Where can we get a copy of “Bones At Breakfast: In Case Of werewolf” and the other works?

Rick:  www.indyplanet.com is where you can get all of the comic book/graphic novels.  This one is listed at $12.99, and we are working on a digital conversion as well.  There is also a price break if you order multiple copies.  www.lulu.com is where you can find the print versions of the existing novels/books, and www.amazon.com has kindle versions available as well, all at affordable costs.

Q7: What events inspire the writing of your stories?

Rick: Like I said, “War Wolf” was inspired by the Moonlight Battle in the American Revolutionary war.  I wanted to show what it would be like to have a werewolf fighting as a soldier.  The name of this battle just seemed logical, so I began the research there.  It was insignificant enough in history, that I could do this without many people going “Well, that isn’t how it went.”  The fact is, that there are so little details about that night, that it is conceivable.

Dan: P.S. That was all pre-Assassins Creed 3 release. <laughs>

Rick: <laughs> yes.  Then there is the “Abominable” story.  I did a big foot story in the novel, so this was the next logical choice.  To make it interesting, I wrote it as a journal entry based on the research of Lt. Colonel Charles Howard Bury.  If you look at the art too, we put in his initials at the bottom.  This is supposed to be his lost journal.  He is the one who invented the term “Abominable Snowman” in 1921, so we wanted to give him a little credit where it was due.

“Annabelle and The Prince” is my twist on the classic “Beauty and the Beast” fairy tale.  In the novel I worked with the 3 little pigs, little red riding hood, and Peter and the wolf all in one.  Keeping with a fairy tale as a spinoff story needed to go toward my daughter’s favorite Disney movie.  I just switched it up quite a bit and made it my own.

With “The Hand Of Eden” the events leading up to that in my novels are based partially on what is in the Bible, so there is a slight religious element to it, that I use to elaborate on legends and what ifs.  Everything I write is based on or at least has elements of truth to it.

Q8: The story “Lunar Loon” is quite different than your everyday werewolf story.  It actually shows what might happen if a werewolf were not just exposed to a full moon, but actually landed on the moon.  Are there any sequel plans to this or closure?

Rick: I do have something planned for that, but I’m not sure it will make it into comic form.  It will be an element in a novel further down the line that refers back to what that race of werewolves is doing inside the moon.  It won’t be anything people expect, but will be a very interesting reveal.

Q9: There seems to be a bit more concept art in terms of variety this time.  Did everyone contribute?

Dan: We decided to keep with just 2 pages, but had 8 of the 10 artists contribute to it.  We encouraged the step by step from the beginning so that we could show the audience how the ideas made it from concept stage to final product.  You get to see the early ideas of each artist, which is cool.  I think it makes people appreciate the hard work that goes into each issue and respect the process more.

Q10: Dan, your art is sometimes known to hide little subtle “Easter eggs” as they call them, or hidden images.  Did you do anything in this one like that?

Dan: No, but it is funny you ask because there are a few hidden tributes in this issue.

Rick: In the “Son of A Bitch” story, since it dealt with the Norse god Loki, I asked Kelly to hide Thor in it somewhere.  I wanted her to draw him in a way that stayed far enough away from the way Marvel comics designed him, but at the same time be sort of like a crossover nod their way.  Also, in Sakura’s story “The Hand of Eden” there is a scene in a rave club where there is a vampire.  Well in the crowd, I had her hide a man who if you look for it, you can tell he is a very similar look to Blade from Marvel.  None of this was done out of disrespect.  In fact, we would love to do more like this in the future, hiding characters or references to Marvel, DC, and many others.  I’ve seen it happen in their comics, and as a form of tribute it is fun to do it in ours.  <laughs> I’m really surprised Dan didn’t hide a penis or something in his pictures somewhere

Dan: That’s because I designed a she-wolf with 6 boobs. <laughs>

Q11: Does sCrypt have any comics planned outside of the realm of the novels?

Rick: Yes, but we haven’t gotten to talk too much about it.  We trademarked the name “Alphabet Ninja”, which will be comic issues rather than graphic novels.  The ideas are there, they are just haven’t made it past that stage yet.

Q12: It sounds like that would be geared toward a younger audience.

Rick: Yes, it will be more age appropriate rather than just for adults, but I can’t claim it will be a children’s book.  There will be adult things like violence and subtle hints of sexuality that will be more for a twelve to thirteen year old’s interest.  Sort of the way the comics were when Dan and I were growing up.  It will take comics back to the roots we enjoyed, and yet not be disrespectful to cross the parental guidance line.

Q13: How will you work artists out for that?

Dan: We were thinking it would be more like an artist an issue.  I will probably design the characters, but let the artists take it from there.  Since it will be a series instead of a standalone graphic novel, this is the best course for us to take.  It is something we really want to do, but time is an issue at the moment because we have family obligations and little cash flow.  If someone came up to us and offered a financial support, it would make it a lot easier to do.  Sometimes we have to work 60 hours a week just to make ends meet and do what we are doing, so, if we could spend those 50 or 60 hours doing the writing and art that we love so much and has become our passion, then imagine where we could be.   We just have to get our name out there somehow.

 


short story – In Case Of Werewolf

These are stories that expand upon the novel “Bones At Breakfast.”

Do your bones ache? Does your instinct sometimes prevail over rational thought? When night descends, do you feel “different”?  If any of these are your symptoms, then you are not alone.  You may have contracted lycanthropy, and when the moon rises, your inner beast will emerge.   This is the third graphic installment in the world of “Flesh And Leftovers,” where cases of werewolves will shatter your bones.   Ten talented artists bring one author’s stories to life in this spinoff of the novel “Bones At Breakfast.

** UPDATE: This is now available as a text short story in print at lulu.com or in digital form as part of the Eden’s Order Trilogy Extras at Amazon

 

Written by Rick Pipito, with featured art by: Dan Pipito, Joe Parisi, Scott Modrzynski, Ivy Duffy, Kristie Vanderzee, Ken Hensley, Michael Coppolecchia, Jacob Greenawalt, Sakura Jones, and Kelly Swann.

Artist Story Details:

Joe Parisi returns as a sCrypt veteran artist, and this time, he is illustrating the journal of a man in search of the Abominable Snowman.  He soon finds out that this creature is not what most people think it is.

Scott Modrzynski takes photography and art to a whole new level in a truly Beautiful and Beastly tale.

Ivy Duffy brings her talent to this issue by showing how animal instincts can take over a man in order to survive being shipwrecked on an island.

Dan Pipito’s watercolor takes us to an alternate future in a dilapidated Philadelphia, where a Lycan queen is hunted by human resistance.

Kristie Vanderzee takes us on a journey through Russia’s underground subways as a rogue soldier gives in to his new werewolf appetite.

Ken Hensley shows us the true story of the historical “Moonlight Battle.”  An ancient wolfman turns the tides of this revolutionary event.

Michael Coppolecchia, a veteran Marvel Comics artist, truly channels a native American Indian’s animal spirit as he attempts to interfere with the white man’s plans to build on his people’s ground.

Jacob Greenawalt adds his style to a story where a man cursed with changing into a wolfman during the cycles of the moon, pilots a craft to the lunar body to see why the moon has these powers over him.  What would happen to a werewolf on the moon?  One man is about to find out.

Sakura Jones enters the Garden Of Eden with us, and what happened once man found it again.  Zombies, vampires and werewolves are cured in a healing wave that sweeps the planet.

Kelly Swann tackles Norse mythology and the story of Loki’s half human half wolf son, Fenrir.

Bones At Breakfast: In Case Of Werewolf  TM and © Rick Pipito. All rights reserved.

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Scarred Face and Psyche poll

There are some men in comics who just can’t seem to show their faces in public.  Even if they did, you wouldn’t want them around because their minds are just as scarred as their faces.  Who are these men?  DC Comics has Two-Face, Marvel Comics has Jigsaw, sCrypt Comics has Marcus (artwork by Dan Pipito), and Midway has Kabal.  Below will be a brief summary of each character, and then a poll.  Vote for who you think would win in a battle or add a character that you feel I should have included.  Have fun and enjoy!

District Attorney Harvey Dent was a man who worked to keep the justice system truly just.  That was until he had half of his face scarred for life.  There are variations on his origin throughout the years, but the most common one would be that he had half of his face blown off in an explosion.  Always a man who struggled with his inner demons, this tragic event forced his split personality to take over.  Two-Face uses a coin to decide which half (Harvey Dent or Two-Face) would act in the decision.  If he was flipping for you, you wouldn’t want to see tails, or you’d most likely be dead.  He first appeared in Detective Comics #66 in 1942.

Billy Russo was a professional hitman and criminal for the Maggia crime family.  As one of the very few people to survive being on the Punisher’s hitlist, Billy was thrown through a pane of glass head first.  After barely surviving, he had a surgeon stitch his face back together like that of a jigsaw puzzle.  As Jigsaw he is one of the most violent mob criminals ever to grace the pages of a comic.  He first appeared in The Amazing Spiderman #162 in 1976.

Marcus was a vampire in medieval times.  He had no special abilities, other than his need for blood, and tendency to maim his victims.  As he chased a woman through the forest, he was stopped by a young boy (who later grew to be King Arthur.)  The boy threw a bucket of mined silver into Marcus’ face.  It horribly scarred him, and forced him into hiding.  When he emerged a month later, he earned the nickname the Stalker.  From the shadows, he would follow his victims and toy with them until entire kingdoms were killed for pleasure and food.  He first appeared in the novel “Blood, The Second Helping,” and his first graphic novel appearance was in “Blood, The Second Helping: Legends Of Vampire.”

As a former member of the criminal organization known as the Black Dragons, he tried to turn his life around and serve for the greater good.  When the evil emperor Shao Kahn invaded earth, Kabal barely survived.  Now he needs a respirator to breathe, and hide his horribly scarred face.  Originally, he reverted to his Black Dragon roots after the attack, but who knows what the future will bring.  Just don’t cross his path if he is armed with his hook swords; he won’t hesitate to gut you from face to feet.  He was first introduced in Mortal Kombat 3.

So there you have it.  Four men who you don’t want to have as your enemy or your friend.  Cast your vote below, and spread the word.

 


“Blood, The Second Helping: Legends Of Vampire” Recap

As we gear up for our third sCrypt Comics graphic novel, as well as the fourth novel in the Flesh and Leftovers series, I decided to go back and look at the past.  Like our previous graphic novel recap we are now going to take a look at sCrypt Comics’ second issue.  We hit a few bumps in the road, and in the end fell short on length, but the art that we had gotten was astonishing to say the least.  It is very difficult trying to organize something like this, and I give these artists all the credit in the world for producing such great work.  Here is where you can get your copy of Blood The Second Helping: Legends Of Vampire”.  

Of course, I highly suggest checking out the full length novels as well, but if you are looking for some interesting and stunning artwork, and something that fits well in with the series, then this is something you don’t want to miss.  Check out the gallery below and click on each picture to see a larger version.  To grab a copy, check out the link on the name above, and of course you can always get the novels where these comics began at www.lulu.com.


Flesh And Leftovers: Zombie Incidents Recap

As we gear up for our third sCrypt Comics graphic novel, as well as the fourth novel in the Flesh and Leftovers series, I decided to go back and look at the past.  sCrypt Comics was formed 2 years ago just prior to releasing our first spinoff in graphic novel form.  “Flesh And Leftovers: Zombie Incidents”  was a learning process, and after a few tweaks, became a fantastic piece of art.  So much different talent went into this, and it only gets better from here.

Of course, I highly suggest checking out the novels, but if you are looking for some interesting and stunning artwork, and something that fits well in with the series, then this is something you don’t want to miss.  Check out the gallery below and click on each picture to see a larger version.  To grab a copy, check out the link on the name above, and of course you can always get the novels where these comics began at www.lulu.com.


Master Combatant Battle Poll

Who is the better fighter?  Who will come out on top?  Batman takes DC Comics’ corner (above left).  Taskmaster fights for Marvel Comics (Above Center).  Kristoff The Wiser takes a stand for sCrypt Comics (Above Right – artwork on Kristoff by Dan Pipito).  Like the other polls, I will do a quick summary of each character, and then you choose who you believe would win.  Please vote for one of the choices, or add your own on who you think would fit the battle well.  The more votes, the better the results.

First up is Batman.  Bruce Wayne was only a young boy when he witnessed both of his parents murders.  From that point on, he vowed to instill fear and exact revenge on those who prey on the innocent.  He traveled the world, learning many different skills and forms of combat.  As a master detective, he combines all of these skills with multiple contingency plans; in order to take down criminals around the world.  Even though he has no super powers, those who do, fear what he is capable of as well.  With the Wayne estate’s billions of dollars, he has a gadget for almost every situation.  His abilities include a genius level intellect, peak physical and mental conditioning, a photographic memory, mastery in multiple forms of combat, and an expert marksman.  Batman first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in 1939.

Next is Tony Masters (aka The Taskmaster).  His abilities were first exhibited as a young boy, while watching television.  After seeing a cowboy use his lasso, Masters was able to mimic all of the intricate rope tricks.  Since then he has primarily being a supervillain, but he has on occasion worked for S.H.I.E.L.D. and other agencies as a trainer and undercover operative.  Taskmaster is someone who is not to be taken lightly.  He has the ability to absorb knowledge instantly, mimic voices, and adapt to any fighting style by learning and replicating his opponents moves in a manner of seconds.  He also has mastered the use of weaponry and carries an extensive arsenal.  Taskmaster first appeared in Avengers #195 in 1980.

Our final combatant is often referred to as “Kristoff The Wiser.”  For over a thousand years, he has had the gift of knowledge.  Although he has the thirst of a vampire, he preys on the guilty.  A unique ability to study anything from book lessons to physical skills enables him to be a threat to any who stand in his path.  His one goal is to be able to cure himself of vampirism.  Until the day where he will find the cure, he will terrorize the criminal scum who cross his path.  Kristoff was first mentioned in “Flesh And Leftovers,” first appeared in “Blood, The Second Helping,” and his first graphic appearance was in “Blood The Second Helping: Legends Of Vampire.”

So there it is folks.  Vote for DC’s Batman, Marvel’s Taskmaster, or sCrypt’s Kristoff.  As mentioned above, feel free to add your own choice to the poll below.


Interview with sCrypt Comics about BTSH: Legends Of Vampire

Blood, The Second Helping: Legends of Vampire – Interview with Rick and Dan Pipito

The following are questions submitted by fans to Rick Pipito and Dan Pipito, co-founders of sCrypt Comics

 

Q1: This is your second installment for sCrypt Comics.  Have you two always wanted to create comics?

Rick: Yeah.  We spent a great deal of our childhood reading comic books, watching the cartoons and playing with action figures based on those characters.  I always loved to tell stories and come up with how we would play out a scenario.  Dan was the art guy.  He has drawn for as long as I can remember, and always had a knack for making obstacles and backgrounds for the little figures.  I think it was just something that we always thought about, but never thought would happen or take seriously until recently.

Q2: How does sCrypt Comics differ from other comic book companies?

Rick: We (at the moment) can’t compete with the major companies like Marvel, DC, Image, Darkhorse etc., but I think what draws audiences to us is that we are more adult oriented.  Horror is our major outing right now and always will be, but we have other stuff (non-horror) in the works as well.

Dan: Independent talent is our workforce.  Our focus to start was to get talent out there.  We wanted all those who had an interest in art to have an artery for exposure.  I think in the independent world at least, we have learned a lot and continue to grow.  Each comic becomes a bigger outing with more experienced talent as well.

Rick: Another thing is that we are working with stories that are already in an established universe.  Each graphic novel includes spinoff stories from the novels I have written.  There are nine novels planned out in the series, and though we are behind them in publishing, we plan to have a graphic version of stories to expand each of those books’ plots.  Like I said too, there are other ideas in the works as well.

Q3: What are your goals?

Rick: We’d love to get major sponsorship and exposure so that we can not only pay out artists on a more professional level, but spread their talent (and ours) also.

Dan: We also reached out to Marvel and DC as well as a few others, to create some competition.  We want to know what they would say about our stuff.  On our blog, we review comics too, so even if they wanted us to see what we think about certain stories, we’d be more than willing to scratch their backs, so to speak.  Most of those comic companies started as small or smaller than we are, so I think we have the advantage there, it is just a matter of getting some recognition.  The definition these days of Independent is sort of loose, but all in all it means someone who is self sufficient.  And that is what we’d like to become.  We’d love to be able to sew the holes in our pockets.  The cost of each comic we do comes straight from our wallets, and that is why it takes us months to do one issue.  We’d love to change that. 

Rick: In the long run too, I think Dan wants to be able to draw, paint and express himself through his art for the world to see.  I want the same with my writing.  My novels are selling, and getting great reviews, but without a big time publisher or agent, everything is a lot of work.  We don’t need to be rich off of it, but if we could bring a couple people with us along the way and all be able to support our families, that would be the icing on the cake.

Q4: Who are your artists this time around?

Dan: Well, if you consider it art, we changed printing companies.  We won’t say names, but our previous printer gave us and a lot of our fans the shaft if you know what I mean.  We were tired of bending over and taking it. 

Rick: The new printer has been awesome.  They have great personalities, and are fun to work with.  Not to mention they put out a great final product and work with you to achieve the best.  As far as artists though, we brought back Joe Parisi from the first comic.  He emailed me and said he would be interested in another outing with us, and we were more than happy to oblige.  He got more time to do it this time, and he wanted to do a different style, which was a completely different look from the first.  I couldn’t believe it, but he literally nailed the story to a point where I swear those images jumped right from my head to the paper through his art.  Everything I envisioned in that story he got down to a T.

Dan: Asher Humm was another artist who came back.  He presented it to us at first as a finished product in black and white, but there was just so much visual that with text he thought it would be too hard on the eyes.  He didn’t have much time in his schedule to do more than the massive amount he already had.  We didn’t feel comfortable getting another artist to fill in color on his work, so… We told him to add some shading, and the next thing you know, he emails Rick and says, “Happy Birthday, man.  This is for you.”  I think Rick crapped himself when he saw the thing in full color.  It was epic.

Rick: Dan did two stories again in this issue that were as impressive as the first, and he helped me with the covers and layout.  Phillip Allie returned too using pencil type work instead of the full on color digital from last time.  I guess it is a good thing when all these artists want to come back, because Leanne Wiedmeyer did as well.  She was able to really take her time this round and do a full color spread.  After coming in at last minute for Flesh, she really earned a spot without even asking for this one.

Dan: Sakura Jones is a new addition that we found through craigslist.  Her portfolio was amazing right off the bat.  She just graduated college and I can tell she is going somewhere with her art.  She captured ancient Egypt nicely.

Rick: Another craigslist addition is Angela McQuillan.  She is very involved in the independent comic scene, and helps run Philly Indy Comiccon.  We were invited last year where we met her and were eager to show her what the first issue looked like.  Her style is unique to these comics in that it is full of vibrant colors.  In horror you don’t usually see that, but it works well in the way she portrays it.

Dan: Her product was very finished and professional looking.  The depth was great in the final print.  A friend of mine, J.C. Spence, also got involved this time.  We had an emergency switch of personnel and called him up to give us a hand filling in.  It was last minute, but he had the experience and knew what he was doing.  He’s been around the major comic book scene for a year or two and knew just how to work the look into the frames.  I actually worked with him in college.  He was a few years ahead of me and graduating, but he asked me to do some background animation work with him on a project, so it isn’t the first time we’ve teamed up on a project.

Rick: With this graphic novel, we had more bumps in the road than the last one.  When we got to a point where we were well beyond our original goal date, we had to fire another artist.  There wasn’t enough time to have a replacement, and the book would have been incomplete without this story.  Dan and I worked with our original storyboards and he arranged it with the script so that we could show the fans what the artists work with.  On the title page for this one we wrote a little note to the fans about the storyboarding.  My wife knew I was really let down by the artist and when I came home from work, she had drawn out a crayon drawing of a scene from that story.  She did it as a joke to cheer me up.  Instead, I laughed, immediately called Dan on the phone and said, “I have our cover for that story.”  The look on her face was priceless, but she let us use it to complete the abomination of my horrible stick figures. <laughs out loud>.

Q5: Did you come into any obstacles with this outing?

Rick: Early on, we had someone say that they wouldn’t be able to do it after committing.  We got someone to replace him fairly quickly.  Two weeks later, the artist who backed out swore that he had time, and me being naïve and trusting, gave him another story from another artist who we had to fire for lack of communications.  Of course, then that same first artist who backed out and came back, was then unable again, so we canned him for good.  It sucked.  I hate firing people.  Now we were down two artists, but Dan filled in for the Samson and Delilah story, and JC Spence took the other story as our saving grace.  When we were just about ready to go to publishing, like we said, we had another unexpected and unprofessional artist screw us.  That is when we had to use the storyboard story.  It’s frustrating when people do this on two levels.  1) they don’t care about other people they are affecting. And 2) It’s my name that has to let the other artists down that they aren’t getting the comic right away because of a delay.  I understand that there are things that come up, and that would be acceptable, but to just ignore a contact attempt or numerous ones, tells me that that person really doesn’t give a shit.

Dan: Yeah, it seems that with this outing we sort of pissed off one of the artists who submitted their material early on.  He never said so, but we got that feel from talking with him.  It’s very hard to run a venture like this with a time schedule and little funding.  We learn each time though and hope to correct our mistakes as well as have forgiveness for our learning.  It’s very difficult to maintain professional attitude when these things happen, but we have to keep our heads about us and move on.  We are positive about our work, and negativity isn’t the way we handle it, so it can be extremely frustrating.

Q6: Tell me about the cover.  Where did you get the idea?

Rick: We wanted to keep with a real photograph like in the first one, and I thought that since vampires are sexy creatures, we had to have a woman’s neck bitten.  Since our theme with titles involves food, ala “The second Helping”, we decided to add the wine glass as if it were filled with blood.  Wine helps us quite a bit in writing and analyzing our ideas, so paying tribute was the least we could do.  The back cover was a little more simple as we just placed some fake blood on a couple glasses and jugs of wine.  It didn’t need to be something that eye catching for the back because there would be text over it.  The inside credits page was also a photo concept by Dan.  We took a glass of water and dropped some fake blood into it.  As it dispersed we had to snap the perfect photo.  It took probably thirty times to nail the shot we wanted, but we got it.  The front again has an old gothic oil painting look to it.  We wanted that filter on there to make it seem a little more horror related.

Dan: Photographing the cover for the first set our precedents.  We needed the theme to stay the same or not stray too far.  Consistency matters.  There was a brief concept of having each artist draw a part of the one character, Cain’s face and making it look like a shattered mirror.  It would have been too difficult to control and we don’t know if that would have been as real looking.

Q7: Where are these comics available, and the books from which they originated?

Rick: www.indyplanet.com and www.comicsmonkey.com have print and digital versions of the graphic novels.  For the novels, www.lulu.com has print versions, and www.amazon.com has digitals.  The itunes store also has a digital of the first novel as does Barnes and Nobles website.  We are working on getting digital versions of the comics up on amazon as well, so that they are available for Kindle.

Q8: Dan, what is it like working with your brother?

Dan: Well, on this comic in particular I was able to co-write a few stories.  Rick gave me the plots and I was familiar with the books, so as he directed I took many liberties in storyboarding and telling the art direction of a few.  For as much as it can be frustrating it was a lot of fun.  The opportunities were… <pauses>

Rick: Are you going to cry? <laughs>

Dan: <chuckles> No.  It is just amazing to do such a unique thing.  Funding to get a few more people on board for post production would be ideal, but I think we’ve got a great thing going.

Q9: Rick, same question to you about working with Dan?

Rick: You know, Dan’s an amazing artist and a lot of the inspiration for my stories.  I always wanted to work alongside Dan, because we seemingly ruled the world when we were younger (at least in our minds).  I did have the opportunity to work with him other than through this venture, and though we’ve had our differences at times, I think our heads have always been clear in our business.  Our minds think a lot alike, so the stories may be my creations, but I think he can relate to them a lot as if they were from his personality as well, and that is why I really wanted him to co-write and write a few.  I trust him to do so.  When we have our butting of heads it is rare, but it’s okay because I’m the older brother and can still beat him up. <laughs>  All in all the co-writing experience was great too.  We sat down frame by frame and talked about what was going to happen.  I even did that for one story with my wife, and it’s neat to see how others that you trust would interpret what you see.  I just feel bad sometimes asking him to do so much in the post production process.  I never know how he is going to take it, even if he immediately agrees.  Sometimes I wonder if he gets pissed off at me for being so “in charge”.

Dan: It’s all part of the production and I realize that.  Having two brothers work on something such as this is great.  Our creations are collaborative and it’s interesting to see where it goes from start to finish.  One of us may come up with an idea and the other will say, “No way.  I don’t like it.”  Basically we knock each other down for ideas where we don’t agree, but then we work to try to make that idea work for both of us.  I think it makes for better arrangements of the stories. 

Rick: In that line of thinking, Dan is never afraid to call me out where I may be wrong.  Even with the novels, he approves of the stories before anyone else sees them.  He’s told me where he thought some things might need to be changed and I value that input.

Q10: How was the concept art page done?

Dan: We kind of threw together some scrap ideas we had, but we want it to get to the point where every artist contributes some of their early stage ideas to the page.  Most graphic novels have a concept art section that is extensive.  It would be nice to have a little more than what we have now and for the next issue we are definitely headed in that direction.  In the art world process is huge, and this is a work of art that should display that.  The stick family that we put in there is kind of a joke.  Everyone has these stick figure families on the back of their cars, and the trend began to annoy me.  I created that zombie stick figure family for my car as a counter joke.  Then Rick made it a standard.  It’s kind of fun creating such a simple thing out of complex characters.  I love the challenge and want people to see it and go “damn, that’s cool.  I want one on my car.”

Rick: Yes, it is a must.  I love them.  Dan took something that we both found stupid and made it an enjoyable joke for us both.  So we have zombie and vampire stick families, but there will be a stick family with each issue hopefully.  Stay tuned for his werewolf one in volume three.


Flesh And Leftovers Viral Video

Click here to view video =====>  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NOTdyC233qM

We have finally broken into the viral video scene with this short film.  “Virus” was written, directed, and edited by Rick Pipito.  Co-Produced by Rick and Dan Pipito.  It also stars Rick Pipito as the human, and Dan Pipito as the zombie.

This is a commercial video to promote the following:

The novel “Flesh And Leftovers” (available in hardback, softback and digital download at: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/rickpipito)

The sCrypt Comics Graphic Novel “Flesh and Leftovers: Zombie Incidents” (available in print and digital download at: www.indyplanet.com and www.comicsmonkey.com)

Please spread the word and grab yourself a copy of each right now!

Thanks for the support,

Rick Pipito and Dan Pipito


Interview with sCrypt Comics about F&L: Zombie Incidents

Here is an interview featuring sCrypt Comics creators, Rick Pipito and Dan Pipito.  They answer fan questions about issue #1: Flesh And Leftovers: Zombie Incidents.  We’ve included a picture of the back cover to show the synopsis.  Enjoy!

 

Q1: There is so much talent involved with all of your artists.  What kind of agreement do you have with them?

Dan: It’s an independent venture without funding behind it.  We want to get artists involved who have talent and like us are struggling to get their names out there.  Working for free is hard this day and age, but sometimes it is the only way to get where you need to be in the end.

Rick: I’ve written up a contract for the artists so that they understand about the “pay.”  Basically it is agreed that they will take the storyboards and make it their style while keeping the story the same.  Once it is completed our end of the bargain must be fulfilled.  We give each artist a copy of the final product as well as any contact info that they want attached to their name in the book.  The new blog also will feature artists of the month, which will give them more exposure when they are chosen.

 

Q2: Tell us about the cover art: front, back, and credits page.

Rick: I came up with the concept based on the title.  The first thing a lot of people think, when they hear “Flesh and Leftovers” is Hannibal Lecter.  So we took some leftover pasta, Tupperware, and Halloween props and took a photo in the fridge for the front and back at different angles.  The credits page was a picture of fake skin stretched over a board and placed under the words.

Dan: We wanted it to be a photo.  Photography is an art form as well, and we didn’t want any one particular cover artist doing it for fear that it would represent all of what is inside.  This way, with the photo passed through a “saran wrap” style filter, it calls out to the viewer to take a peek.

Q3: What is the whole process from hiring to finished product like?

Rick: We took an ad out on Craigslist and immediately got a dozen hits.  Most of the responses we got were enthusiastic.  We chose the ones we liked based on pieces of art they had sent us.  Then the stories, which are already written and copywritten, are turned into storyboards.  I am a horrendous illustrator.  So what the artists do with the storyboards I give them is amazing.  To explain what I am trying to portray I also send them a document with the script and explanations of what is going on.

Dan: Once the artists submit their work in the allotted time, we filter and do basic editing of page sizes and making sure there is bleed along the edges.  We are learning more each time ourselves, because the publishers have terminology and things that we have to sometimes work around.  Our first publisher probably won’t be around much longer only because they just don’t know how to run a business, but we switched to IndyPlanet and have since been overjoyed with the process.

Rick: When the files are ready to be printed I pay out of pocket for each of the artists’ copies.  The payoff is actually getting to meet some of them in person.  Obviously not everyone is from around our area, but if I can’t physically meet them, we send it in the mail.  Everyone is understanding and patient, which helps a lot.  When one person submits art late, it screws every artist on the team, but looks bad on my part.  We do our best to avoid any problems, but sometimes it is inevitable and you have to just roll with it.

 

Q4: Where did you guys come up with the sCrypt Comics name and logo?

Dan: We wanted something cool and catchy, and we had a horror theme.  I grew up watching Tales from the Crypt the TV series, so when Rick handed me a script for one of the stories it reminded me of the old show I used to watch.  I took the word script and made it sCrypt.  The coffin logo had to be simple.  I used to draw old logos and I wanted it to be something we could do on the spot if need be.  It’s easy but catchy and that is what we wanted.

 

Q5: So are all these stories just graphic versions of your existing novels?

Rick: yes and no.  I didn’t want to repeat anything from the novels or change the image that people may get in their heads when reading them.  That is the beauty of a novel.  It’s that you can picture the story in your head, and it becomes personal for each reader.  I had a lot of reader requests for more zombie stories, but I had already done what I wanted for zombies. Dan was a fan of the book, so I went to him with the idea, and he liked it.  There were a few ideas that I cut and some back stories with characters and settings that I thought a comic book version would be the perfect place for.  These stories are more of an accessory to the Flesh and Leftovers novel.  Both go hand in hand, but you don’t need one to enjoy the other (though I highly recommend the full experience).

Dan: At first, I thought it would be great, but it was too big of a task for just the two of us.  That is when Rick told me about getting other artists on board for the stories as a collaborative effort.  It was a genius idea really.

 

Q6: Where can I get the comics?

Rick: The graphic novels are available at www.indyplanet.com and the novel that started it all is at www.lulu.com.

Q7: What kind of obstacles did you face with “Flesh and Leftovers: Zombie Incidents”?

Rick: It’s a trust thing really.  Everyone agrees to a deadline and they commit themselves to it, but there are always bad seeds.  Something comes up and then suddenly your artist is afraid to communicate with you or they back out.  We had to get rid of a couple people, but we scrambled last minute to fix the problems.

Q8: Dan, what is your input in the writing process?

Dan: I had loved the stories Rick had written and he basically came to me for criticism and advice.  So when we wanted the new stories to be in the comic, we really sat down together and took notes on how we would lay it out in the easiest way for the artists.  I co-wrote the circus story using faces of some people I knew or at least some inspiration.  I had never written before, and though Rick came up with the whole story, he basically gave me a beginning and an end and let me do the in between based on his narrative and dialogue.  It’s a lot of fun, but takes time to get right.

Q9: I see that there is a concept and sketch art page in the back.  Why did you include this as well?

Rick:  I hadn’t read comic books in years, so when we started I had to do some research in the library.  I must have taken out thirty or so graphic novels for their layout ideas and stories, but then I noticed that they all had one thing in common.  There was at least one concept art page at the end, and that was something I thought would be cool.  Dan had some art lying around, as well as a couple other people, and my storyboard stuff was filtered through to select a couple of those.  It’s really to show our progress, but at the same time is funny to look at.  Dan also put up the zombie stick figure art, which in my mind was perfect.

Dan: Yeah, everyone in the world seems to have those stick figure families on the backs of their cars.  It drove me crazy as I thought it was a stupid trend, but then I got sucked in and made my own parody family with zombies.  It had nothing to do with the comic, but they had to be presented.  The sketch art page is basically the director’s cut of things that didn’t make it.  As bad as some of the sketches are, they are all responsible partly for the final product.

Q10: What can you tell your fans about the artists?

Rick: Like I said, we took out an ad on Craigslist, and the first response I got was from Phillip Allie.  He had a pretty cool portfolio with skulls and zombie heads.  It was dark and a unique style of art, so I didn’t hesitate to bring him in.  Asher Humm contacted me next and I was immediately blown away.  He had a published comic book already and his style was exactly what you see in the professional industry.  He also has some great ideas and criticism on how the whole process goes, so I’m glad to have his input as well.

Dan: Sequential art amazes me as well, and when I saw Asher’s work I was super excited to have that skill level involved.  We both worked with Fred Loeffler.  It took some convincing, but he was on board eventually and brought a more retro style to it.  He is from a different generation and has more experience than the rest of us, so it worked well with his talent.  We had two high school girls who were trying to build their portfolios.  TJB and Tiff Pugliese had seen the ad and were in the process of college hunting.  We had seen their portfolios and were happy to add their styles to the collection.

Rick: Our cousin, Vince Pipito, came in and hadn’t been a practicing artist in a few years, but he had loved the novels and wanted to work with us.  He needed help scanning and laying out the panels, but the art looks sweet and really captured the feel I was going for.  Joe Parisi was a guy we had ready to go for the second graphic novel, but we had to fire a couple of artist last minute and he was more than ready to jump in the slot.  He had the zombie children story and contacted me and said, “Hey, man, it’s your story, but I was thinking since it involves children, I’m going to do it in crayon.”  I called Dan and said, “This guy might be crazy, but his art is fantastic.”  We laughed and wondered how he was going to pull off crayon in a very limited amount of time, but it is one of the fan favorites now.

Dan: Leanne Wiedmeyer also came in to save the day.  We put up a status on facebook that we were looking for an artist last minute to help us out in two weeks’ time.  We didn’t expect anyone to actually do it, but Lee was also on standby for comic 2 and she said she’d do it.  Using pencil, she got back to us in a week and a half with a finished product that blew us away.

Rick: Dan also had to pick up a last minute add on for the third artist we fired.  So he has 2 stories in this one, but each was done in a different style.

Dan: Sure, there were a few that might not have lived up to some of our expectations initially, but it was the passion of the group of artists that really gave us the final product that we were hoping for.

The series so far includes the novels available at www.lulu.com: “Flesh and Leftovers,” “Blood, The Second Helping,” & “Bones At Breakfast”

The graphic novels available at www.indyplanet.com and www.comicsmonkey.com: Flesh and Leftovers: Zombie Incidents,” & “Blood The Second Helping: Legends Of Vampire”

DIGITAL FORMS OF THE ABOVE NOVELS AND GRAPHIC NOVELS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE ABOVE SITES.  YOU CAN ALSO GET THE PRINTED NOVEL OF ALL OF THE ABOVE PLUS MORE IN THE “Flesh And Leftovers: Eden’s Order Trilogy”


February 2012 Artist Of The Month: Dan Pipito

sCrypt Comics Artist of the month for February 2012 is Dan Pipito.  Dan created the name and logo for our comic adventures, and has been active in producing and creating our publications.  We figured for this fact alone, that he should be included as the first artist of the month.  Above is a piece of artwork that he wished to display along with the bio below. 

Rooted in illustration and fine art, Dan’s art has led him to work in a variety of medium.  His sculptural work provided his passion for human anatomy, being able to create life like textures and a full representation of the body, inside and out. This also granted him a U.S. patent for medical simulation design and the gruesome insight for illustrations of pop culture icons. 

Studying animation in University, he has taken the ideas and process of the moving picture and incorporated life into every mark made with a brush.  He works as an artist in an upcoming short Aloha Grocery. (created by Jacob Greenawalt)

Dan continues to refine his work, but his heart is with watercolors, allowing him to paint as a fine artist or relay quick illustrated pieces in his free-lance work.  His work has spread to the entertainment industry helping to produce and cofound sCrypt comics, as well as fan art of the gaming world. He continually pushes to have his work open to the eyes of a bigger audience. 

(PLEASE DO NOT USE THE IMAGE ABOVE WITHOUT PERMISSION FROM DAN PIPITO)

To contact Dan Pipito, feel free to comment here, or email him at: dpipito@gmail.com

Dan is also on Twitter and Instagram @dpipito

 

 


Short Story – Legends Of Vampire

You are alone with someone you just met. You hit it off and lean in to kiss that person, only to realize that their teeth are now two inch fangs. Your “friend” is a vampire thirsting for your blood. Welcome to the second installment in the graphic world of “Flesh And Leftovers,” where vampire legends will make your blood race. One author’s ideas are brought to life by eight talented artists in this graphic spinoff of “Blood, The Second Helping” the novel.

The novel, “Blood, The Second Helping”, lured fans into its vampire mythology. Now, in this graphic spin off, fans will be able to visualize some of the events that happened leading up to and after those events. You don’t need to have read the novel to appreciate the art from 8 different artists. 

Written by Rick Pipito, Dan Pipito and Roberta Pipito.

Featuring artwork by: Dan Pipito, Asher Humm, Leanne Wiedmeyer, Joe Parisi, Angela McQuillan, Phillip Allie, J.C. Spence, Sakura Jones.

**Update: This is now available as a text short story.  It can be found in print at lulu.com or in digital form as part of the Eden’s Order Trilogy extras at Amazon.

Artist Story Details:

Joe Parisi is back for a second time with “Hunting The Hunter.”  Before the events in Blood, The Second Helping the novel, Darius Moon is hunted because of what he is.  The military will stop at nothing to get their hands on this vampire.

Asher Humm has returned for a second time and in full color.  “Eternal Guardian” is the story about a vampire who communicates with his natural surroundings.  When a group of archaeologists go searching for the Fountain of Youth, they do not expect what lies in waiting.

Dan Pipito, sCrypt Comics’ co-founder, watercolors two stories in this installment.  “Seeking The Cure” is about a vampire during the Russo-Japanese War who is seeking a cure for his blood lust.  “Samson and Delilah” is a new take on the Biblical story.

Phillip Allie is back for a second time with “The Lying Truth.”  When the CIA blackmail a woman into becoming their assassin, they aren’t prepared for her vampiric backlash.

Leanne Wiedmeyer returns with “Wine And Dine.”  They say that wine is good for your blood… that is unless you go to the Time and a Bottle winery.

Sakura Jones brings in new talent with “A Monument To Serve.”  Ancient Egypt holds many secrets, but solving the riddle of the sphinx could be the deadliest of them all.

Angela McQuillan is here to present “The Question.”  Bram Stoker’s inspiration comes from this lord of the undead who is building a selective army of his own.

J.C. Spence illustrates “Mind Astray”.  When two of the characters from the novels exist in the same body, they struggle in a dream like state for ultimate control.

Rick, Roberta, and Dan Pipito present the storyboards for “Shadow Stalker.” A medieval vampire hides from his prey until the moment to strike.

Blood, The Second Helping: Legends Of Vampire TM and © 2011 Rick Pipito. All rights reserved.


Short story – Zombie Incidents

It’s dark.  You can feel the presence of something reeking of death.  Then there are more of them.  You look around and find that you are surrounded by zombies that want to devour you.  This is the world of Flesh and Leftovers, where tales of zombie incidents will make your skin crawl.  Ten short stories are illustrated by nine amazing artists in this graphic spinoff of “Flesh And Leftovers” the novel.  Author Rick Pipito has expanded his stories to an audience of artists to bring his zombie apocalypse to life (or unlife). 

*** Update.  This is now available as a text short story.  The comic is currently limited, but the short can be found at Lulu.com in print or with the Eden’s Order Trilogy extras on Amazon in digital form

ARTIST AND STORY INFO:

Joe Parisi puts crayon to use in “Dangerous Youth.”  When two parents argue over what to do about their zombified children, things get ugly.

Phillip Allie takes the town of Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania into a digital medium.  “Ready Or Not” is about a man who is prepared for the worst, but doesn’t realize what the worst is until it comes knocking on his door.

Asher Humm, a born comic book artist, tells the story “Medicine Man,” about a voodoo master that becomes one of his own creations.

Tiff Pugliese illustrates “The Dead Wars.”  In medieval times humans must make the ultimate sacrifice to defeat the hordes of undead.

Vince Pipito brings a psychedelic form of art to “Dreaming The Stranger.”  Is what the character seeing just a bad trip, or is it part of a much larger plot?

TJB uses an anime style art in “Demons Of The Abyss.”  Long before humans were able to fend for themselves, four gods were placed in an apocalyptic tablet.  Only time will tell what would happen when they escape.

Dan Pipito, sCrypt Comics co-founder, brings two stories to life.  After some of the events in Flesh and Leftovers the novel, a detective investigates clues leading to a zombified circus in “Just Another Freak.”  Then in “Old Habits Die Hard” a cannibal tries to blend in with society, but can’t fight the urges with which he is so familiar.

Leanne Wiedmeyer uses pencil to tell the story of a church where people have taken refuge.  When the undead infiltrate the safehouse panic ensues in “Absolution.”

Fred Loeffler takes on “New Species.”  NASA has brought something back from their latest mission, but when it unleashes a deadly parasite, those infected crave flesh.

Rick Pipito wrote all the above stories, based on characters and events in his novel “Flesh And Leftovers.”  Get the original novel now at www.lulu.com as a companion to this talent filled graphic novel (available at the links above).

Flesh & Leftovers: Zombie Incidents TM and © 2010 Rick Pipito. All rights reserved.